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Monthly Archives: January 2000

Attachment, Bonding, and Reciprocal Connectedness: Limitations of Attachment Theory in the Juvenile and Family Court
Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, 2000

It could be reasonably asked why there is a need to introduce a new term (reciprocal connectedness) into the forensic lexicon. The reasons are multiple, but they can be summarized as follows: Attachment and bonding have evolved as concepts that focus on security-seeking (the desire for proximity to a caretaker) to the relative exclusion of other critically important aspects of human relationships in the context of development.

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Attachment, Bonding, and Reciprocal Connectedness: Limitations of Attachment Theory in the Juvenile and Family Court
Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, 2000

It could be reasonably asked why there is a need to introduce a new term (reciprocal connectedness) into the forensic lexicon. The reasons are multiple, but they can be summarized as follows: Attachment and bonding have evolved as concepts that focus on security-seeking (the desire for proximity to a caretaker) to the relative exclusion of other critically important aspects of human relationships in the context of development.